まったく現代的なマルクス 『フォーリン・ポリシー』誌に論文

『フォーリン・ポリシー』2009年5-6月号

米外交専門誌『フォーン・ポリシー』誌2009年5-6月号に、「まったく現代的なマルクス」と題する論文が掲載されています。ちなみに、同号は表紙もマルクスです↑。

Foreign Policy: Thoroughly Modern Marx

著者Leo Panich氏は、Socialist Register の編集者なので、彼がマルクスについて書くのは不思議ではありませんが、それが『フォーリン・ポリシー』誌に掲載されたというところが面白いですね。

Thoroughly Modern Marx

[Foreign Policy May/June 2009]

By Leo Panitch

The economic crisis has spawned a resurgence of interest in Karl Marx. Worldwide sales of Das Kapital have shot up (one lone German publisher sold thousands of copies in 2008, compared with 100 the year before), a measure of a crisis so broad in scope and devastation that it has global capitalism — and its high priests — in an ideological tailspin.

Yet even as faith in neoliberal orthodoxies has imploded, why resurrect Marx? To start, Marx was far ahead of his time in predicting the successful capitalist globalization of recent decades. He accurately foresaw many of the fateful factors that would give rise to today's global economic crisis: what he called the "contradictions" inherent in a world comprised of competitive markets, commodity production, and financial speculation.

Penning his most famous works in an era when the French and American revolutions were less than a hundred years old, Marx had premonitions of AIG and Bear Stearns trembling a century and a half later. He was singularly cognizant of what he called the "most revolutionary part" played in human history by the bourgeoisie — those forerunners of today's Wall Street bankers and corporate executives. As Marx put it in The Communist Manifesto, "The bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionizing the instruments of production, and thereby relations of production, and with them the whole relations of society…… In one word, it creates a world after its own image."

But Marx was no booster of capitalist globalization in his time or ours. Instead, he understood that "the need for a constantly expanding market for its products chases the bourgeoisie over the whole surface of the globe," foreseeing that the development of capitalism would inevitably be "paving the way for more extensive and exhaustive crises." Marx identified how disastrous speculation could trigger and exacerbate crises in the whole economy. And he saw through the political illusions of those who would argue that such crises could be permanently prevented through incremental reform.

Like every revolutionary, Marx wanted to see the old order overthrown in his lifetime. But capitalism had plenty of life left in it, and he could only glimpse, however perceptively, the mistakes and wrong turns that future generations would commit. Those of us now cracking open Marx will find he had much to say that is relevant today, at least for those looking to "recover the spirit of the revolution," not merely to "set its ghost walking again."

If he were observing the current downturn, Marx would certainly relish pointing out how flaws inherent in capitalism led to the current crisis. He would see how modern developments in finance, such as securitization and derivatives, have allowed markets to spread the risks of global economic integration. Without these innovations, capital accumulation over the previous decades would have been significantly lower. And so would it have been if finance had not penetrated more and more deeply into society. The result has been that consumer demand (and hence, prosperity) in recent years has depended more and more on credit cards and mortgage debt at the same time that the weakened power of trade unions and cutbacks in social welfare have made people more vulnerable to market shocks.

This leveraged, volatile global financial system contributed to overall economic growth in recent decades. But it also produced a series of inevitable financial bubbles, the most dangerous of which emerged in the U.S. housing sector. That bubble's subsequent bursting had such a profound impact around the globe precisely because of its centrality to sustaining both U.S. consumer demand and international financial markets. Marx would no doubt point to this crisis as a perfect instance of when capitalism looks like "the sorcerer who is no longer able to control the powers of the netherworld whom he has called up by his spells."

Despite the depth of our current predicament, Marx would have no illusions that economic catastrophe would itself bring about change. He knew very well that capitalism, by its nature, breeds and fosters social isolation. Such a system, he wrote, "leaves no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous 'cash payment.'" Indeed, capitalism leaves societies mired "in the icy water of egotistical calculation." The resulting social isolation creates passivity in the face of personal crises, from factory layoffs to home foreclosures. So, too, does this isolation impede communities of active, informed citizens from coming together to take up radical alternatives to capitalism.

Marx would ask first and foremost how to overcome this all-consuming social passivity. He thought that unions and workers' parties developing in his time were a step forward. Thus in Das Kapital he wrote that the "immediate aim" was "the organization of the proletarians into a class" whose "first task" would be "to win the battle for democracy." Today, he would encourage the formation of new collective identities, associations, and institutions within which people could resist the capitalist status quo and begin deciding how to better fulfill their needs.

No such ambitious vision for enacting change has arisen from the crisis so far, and it is this void that Marx would find most troubling of all. In the United States, some recent attention-getting proposals have been derided as "socialist," but only appear to be radical because they go beyond what the left of the Democratic Party is now prepared to advocate. Dean Baker, codirector of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, for example, has called for a $2 million cap on certain Wall Street salaries and the enactment of a financial transactions tax, which would impose an incremental fee on the sale or transfer of stocks, bonds, and other financial assets. Marx would view this proposal as a perfect case of thinking inside the box, because it explicitly endorses (even while limiting) the very thing that is now popularly identified as the problem: a culture of risk disassociated from consequence. Marx would be no less derisive toward those who think that bank nationalizations — such as those that took place in Sweden and Japan during their financial crises in the 1990s — would amount to real change.

Ironically, one of the most radical proposals making the rounds today has come from an economist at the London School of Economics, Willem Buiter, a former member of the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee and certainly no Marxist. Buiter has proposed that the whole financial sector be turned into a public utility. Because banks in the contemporary world cannot exist without public deposit insurance and public central banks that act as lenders of last resort, there is no case, he argues, for their continuing existence as privately owned, profit-seeking institutions. Instead they should be publicly owned and run as public services. This proposal echoes the demand for "centralization of credit in the banks of the state" that Marx himself made in the Manifesto. To him, a financial-system overhaul would reinforce the importance of the working classes' winning "the battle of democracy" to radically change the state from an organ imposed upon society to one that responds to it.

"From financialisation of the economy to the socialisation of finance," Buiter wrote, is "a small step for the lawyers, a huge step for mankind." Clearly, you don't need to be a Marxist to have radical aspirations. You do, however, have to be some sort of Marxist to recognize that even at a time like the present, when the capitalist class is on its heels, demoralized and confused, radical change is not likely to start in the form of "a small step for the lawyers" (presumably after getting all the "stakeholders" to sit down together in a room to sign a document or two). Marx would tell you that, without the development of popular forces through radical new movements and parties, the socialization of finance will fall on infertile ground. Notably, during the economic crisis of the 1970s, radical forces inside many of Europe's social democratic parties put forward similar suggestions, but they were unable to get the leaders of those parties to go along with proposals they derided as old-fashioned.

Attempts to talk seriously about the need to democratize our economies in such radical ways were largely shunted aside by parties of all stripes for the next several decades, and we are still paying the price for marginalizing those ideas. The irrationality built into the basic logic of capitalist markets — and so deftly analyzed by Marx — is once again evident. Trying just to stay afloat, each factory and firm lays off workers and tries to pay less to those kept on. Undermining job security has the effect of undercutting demand throughout the economy. As Marx knew, microrational behavior has the worst macroeconomic outcomes. We now can see where ignoring Marx while trusting in Adam Smith's "invisible hand" gets you.

The financial crisis today also exposes irrationalities in realms beyond finance. One example is U.S. President Barack Obama's call for trading in carbon credits as a solution to the climate crisis. In that supposedly progressive proposal, corporations that meet emissions standards sell credits to others that fail to meet their own targets. The Kyoto Protocol called for a similar system swapped across states. Fatefully however, both plans depend on the same volatile derivatives markets that are inherently open to manipulation and credit crashes. Marx would insist that, to find solutions to global problems such as climate change, we need to break with the logic of capitalist markets rather than use state institutions to reinforce them. Likewise, he would call for international economic solidarity rather than competition among states. As he put it in the Manifesto, "United action, of the leading … countries, at least, is the first condition for the emancipation of the proletariat."

Yet the work of building new institutions and movements for change must begin at home. Although he made the call "Workers of the world, unite!" Marx still insisted that workers in each country "first of all settle things with their own bourgeoisie." The measures required to transform existing economic, political, and legal institutions would "of course be different in different countries." But in every case, Marx would insist that the way to bring about radical change is first to get people to think ambitiously again.

How likely is that to happen? Even at a moment when the financial crisis is bleeding dry a vast swath of the world's people, when collective anxiety shakes every age, religious, and racial group, and when, as always, the deprivations and burdens are falling most heavily on ordinary working people, the prognosis is uncertain. If he were alive today, Marx would not look to pinpoint exactly when or how the current crisis would end. Rather, he would perhaps note that such crises are part and parcel of capitalism's continued dynamic existence. Reformist politicians who think they can do away with the inherent class inequalities and recurrent crises of capitalist society are the real romantics of our day, themselves clinging to a naive utopian vision of what the world might be. If the current crisis has demonstrated one thing, it is that Marx was the greater realist.

ということで、またまたヘッポコ訳です。

まったく現代的なマルクス

[フォーリン・ポリシー 2009年5-6月号]

レオ・パニッチ

 経済危機は、カール・マルクスにたいする関心の復活をもたらした。『資本論』の世界中での売り上げは急上昇している(2008年中にドイツの出版社1社で数千部を売り上げたが、それ以前は年100冊だった)。危機の程度は広がりと酷さの点で非常に広範であり、その結果、グローバル資本主義は――そして、その高貴な聖職者たちも――イデオロギー的な混乱に陥っている。
 新自由主義の正当派理論の信仰が破綻したとはいえ、なぜマルクスの復活なのか? まず、この数十年の資本主義的グローバリゼーションの成功を予言する点で、マルクスは、時代よりもずっと前を行っていた。彼は、今日のグローバルな経済危機を引き起こすであろう多くの致命的諸要因を正確に見通していた。すなわち、彼の言うところの、競争的市場、商品生産および金融投機からなる世界に固有の「矛盾」である。
 非常に著名なマルクスの諸著作はフランス革命やアメリカ独立革命から100年近くしかたっていない時代のものだが、彼は、150年後のAIGやベア・スターンズの破綻を予感していた。彼は、人類史の中でブルジョアジー――今日のウォール街の銀行家や企業幹部の先駆者たち――によって演じられる、彼の言うところの「もっとも革命的な役割」にはっきりと気がついていた。たとえばマルクスは『共産党宣言』でこう書いた。「ブルジョアジーは、生産用具を、したがって生産諸関係を、そしてそれとともに社会諸関係の全体を、絶えず変革することなしには、存在することができない。……一言でいえば、ブルジョアジーは自分自身の姿にしたがって世界をつくる」[1]
 しかし、マルクスは、当時においても今日の時代においても、資本主義的グローバリゼーションの促進者ではなかった。そうではなくて、彼は、資本主義の発展が必ず「もっと幅広く、かつ余地を残さない危機への道を鋪装する」だろうということを予見することによって、「その生産物にたいする市場をつねに拡大しようという欲求が、ブルジョアジーを全地球上に駆りたてる」[2]ことを理解したのである。マルクスは、なぜ破滅的投機が経済全体の危機の引き金を引き、激化させることができるのかを見極めた。そして、彼は、もっと改良を重ねればそのような危機は永久に防止できると主張する人々の政治的幻想を看破した。
 すべての革命家と同じように、マルクスは、生きているうちに古い秩序がくつがえされるのを見たいと思っていた。しかし、資本主義は、十分な寿命を残していた。彼には、将来の世代がおかすであろう誤りおよび間違った転換を感じとること――といっても、明確に、ではあるが――ができただけだった。われわれのように、いまマルクスを開きつつある人々は、彼が、今日にも――少なくとも、「その亡霊がふたたび歩き回るようにする」ためだけではなく、「革命の精神を取り戻す」ことをめざす人々にとって――妥当するというべき多くのものを持っていたことを発見するだろう。
 もしマルクスが現在のダウンタウンを観察したならば、彼は、間違いなく、資本主義につきものの欠陥がいかにして今日の危機をもたらしたか、喜んで指摘しただろう。彼は、証券化や金融分野での現代的な発展によって、どのようにして市場がグローバルな経済統合のリスクの拡大を許したかを見て取っただろう。もし、このようなイノベーションがなかければ、過去数十年にわたる資本蓄積はもっと低調だっただろう。そして、もし金融が社会の中にもっと深く入り込んでいなかったならば、そうなったかもしれない。結果は、近年の消費者の需要(そして、それゆえに成功)がクレジットカードとモーゲージ債権にさらにいっそう依拠するようになったことだった。それと同時に、労働組合の力の弱体化と社会保障の切り下げによって、人々は、さらにいっそう市場のショックにさらされることになった。
 それをテコにして、不安定なグローバル金融システムが最近数十年にすべての経済成長を促進した。しかし、それはまた、一連の不可避的な金融バブルを生み出した。そのうちでもっとも危険なものがアメリカの住宅部門で生じた。それに引き続いて起きたバブルの破裂は、それがアメリカの消費需要と国際的な金融市場を維持する中心であったために、地球全体に大きな衝撃を与えた。マルクスなら間違いなく、この危機を、資本主義が「自分が魔法で呼び出した地下の魔力をもはや制御できなくなった魔法使い」[3]のようにみえる完璧な瞬間だと指摘しただろう。
 現在の窮地の深さにもかかわらず、マルクスは、経済的崩壊がそれ自体で変革をもたらすだろうという幻想は持たなかっただろう。彼は、資本主義が本来的に社会的な孤立化を生み育てることをよく知っていた。彼はこう書いている。そのようなシステムは「人間と人間とのあいだに、むき出しの自己利益、平然とした『現金支払い』以外の何の関係も残さない」[4]。その結果生じる社会的な孤立化によって、人は、個人的な危機――工場の一時帰休から住宅喪失まで――に直面したとき、受動的になる。それゆえにまた、この孤立化によって、活動的で知的な市民たちのコミュニティーは、団結して資本主義にたいするラディカルなオルタナティブを取り上げることから遠ざけられる。
 マルクスなら、何よりもまず、このすべてを飲み尽くす社会的受動性にどうやって打ち勝つかを問題にするだろう。彼は、当時のの労働組合と労働者政党の発展が前進の第一歩だと考えた。それゆえ、『資本論』でマルクスは、「直接的な目的」は「プロレタリアートの階級への組織化」であり、その「最初の任務」は「民主主義をかちとること」だろうと書いた。今日であれば、マルクスは、新しい集合的な主体性、アソシエーション、そして人々が資本主義の現状に抵抗し、どうすれば彼らの必要をよりよく満足させるか決めることができる諸制度の形成を奨励しただろう。
 そのような変革をもたらすための意欲的なビジョンは、いまのところ、危機からは生じていない。そして、この欠如にこそ、マルクスは最大の混乱を発見したことだろう。アメリカでは、最近注目を集めたいくつかの提案が「社会主義的」だといって嘲笑されたが、それらは、唯一根本的なもののように思われる。なぜなら、それらは、民主党左派がいま主張しようとしているもの以上にすすんでいるからである。例えば、経済政策研究センターの共同ディレクターであるディーン・バンカーは、ウォール街の給与を200万ドル以下に制限することや、株や債券、その他金融資産の販売や取引に累進的な手数料を課す金融取引税の制定などを求めている。マルクスなら、この提案を、箱の内部を考えた完璧なケースとみなしただろう。なぜならば、それは明らかに、いまや広く問題だと見なされているあらゆる事柄、すなわち、結果から切り離されたリスクという文化を裏書するからだ(限界があるにせよ)。それにもかかわらず、マルクスは、銀行国有化――1990年代の金融危機のさなかにあったスウェーデンや日本でおこなわれたような――が現実的な変化をもたすだろうと考えるような人々を嘲笑しただろう。
 皮肉なことに、現在出されているなかでもっともラディカルな提案の1つは、ロンドン・スクール・オブ・エコノミクスの経済学者ウィレム・ビッターからきたものだ。彼は、イングランド銀行金融政策委員会の著名なメンバーで、もちろんマルクス主義者ではない。ビッターは、金融セクター全体を1つの公共企業体にするよう提案している。なぜなら、今日の世界で銀行は、公的資金による保証や最後の貸し手として働く公的な中央銀行なしには存在し得ないからだ。
 ビッターは書いている。「経済の金融化から金融の社会化へ」は「法律家にとっては小さな一歩だが、人類にとっては巨大な一歩である」、と。明らかなことは、ラディカルな望みをいだくために、人はマルクス主義者である必要はない、ということだ。しかしながら、次のことを認めるためには、人はいくらかはマルクス主義者にならなければならない。すなわち、資本家階級がひざまずき、落ち込み、慌てふためいている現在のような時期であっても、ラディカルな変革は、「法律家にとって小さな一歩」の形では(おそらく、すべての「利害関係者たち」が一堂に会して、1つか2つの文書にサインしたぐらいでは)始まりそうもない、ということだ。マルクスならこういうだろう。ラディカルな新しい運動や政党を通じた人民の力の発展がなければ、金融の社会化は何の実りももたらさないだろう、と。とくに1970年代の経済危機のあいだ、多くのヨーロッパの社会民主党内のラディカルな勢力は、似たような提案を前面に掲げたが、彼らは、自分たちの党指導者たちを、彼らが流行おくれだと馬鹿にした提案に賛成させることができなかった。
 われわれの経済をそのようなラディカルなやり方で民主化する必要について真剣に語り合う試みは、その後数十年、すべてのストライプ(?)の政党によってほとんど棚上げされた。そして、われわれは、このようなアイデアを軽視するために依然として代償を支払っている。資本主義的市場の基本的な考え方のなかに埋め込まれている――そして、マルクスによって巧みに分析された――不条理は、再び明白になった。破産しないために、それぞれの工場や企業は労働者を一時帰休させ、賃金の支払いを減らそうとしている。職の不安定化は、経済全体では需要の切り下げる効果をもつ。マルクスが理解していたように、ミクロ的な合理的行動は、最悪のマクロ経済学的な結果をもたらす。われわれはいまや、アダム・スミスの「見えざる手」を信奉して、マルクスを無視し続けることによって、どこに導かれるかを理解した。
 今日の金融危機も、金融をこえた領域において不合理性を暴露している。たとえば、バラク・オバマ米大統領は、カーボン・クレジットの取引を、気候危機の解決策として提唱している。その進歩的と思われる提案では、排出基準を満たした企業は、自らの目標を満たすことに失敗した他の企業に、クレジットを売る。京都議定書は、国家をまたいで交換されるに多様なシステムを提案している。しかしながら致命的なことには、どちらのプランも、同じ不安定なデリバティブ市場に依拠しているが、その市場は本来的に不正とクレジット崩壊に陥りやすいのだ。マルクスなら次のように主張しただろう。すなわち、気候変動のようなグローバルな問題を解決するためには、資本主義市場を補強する国家諸制度を用いるよりも、資本主義市場の論理と手を切る必要がある、と。同じように、彼は、国家間の競争より国際的な経済連帯を求めただろう。『宣言』で述べたように、「少なくとも指導的な…諸国の統一された行動がプロレタリアート解放の第一条件である」[5]
 とはいえ、変革のための新しい制度と運動を構築する仕事は、自国ではじめなければならない。「万国の労働者、団結せよ!」と呼びかけたにもかかわらず、マルクスは、なお、各国の労働者は「まず第一に、自分たち自身のブルジョアジーとかたをつける」[6]と主張した。現存の経済的、政治的および法律的制度を変革するために必要とされる方策は、「もちろん、さまざまな国によって異なる」[7]だろう。しかし、どんな場合でも、マルクスは、ラディカルな変革を始める方法は、まず人々が再び意欲的に考えることだと主張しただろう。
 どうすれば同じようなことが起きるのか? 金融危機が世界中の人々から巨大な取り分を搾取するとき、集合的不安がすべての年齢、宗教、およびラディカルグループを揺り動かすとき、そして、いつものように、損失と負担が平凡な勤労人民のうえに最も重くのしかかってくるとき――そんな瞬間でさえ、予知は不確かである。もしマルクスが今日生きていたとしても、いつ、どのようにして現在の危機が終息するか正確に指摘することはなかっただろう。むしろ、おそらく彼は、そのような危機が、資本主義の継続的でダイナミックな存在の重要部分であることに注意を向けただろう。本来的な階級的不平等と資本主義社会の周期的危機とをなんとかできると考える改良主義的政治家たちは、世界はこうあるべきだという生まれつきのユートピア的ビジョンにしがみつく現代の本物の夢想家だ。もし現在の危機が1つのことを証明するとしたら、それは、マルクスこそ最大の現実主義者だった、ということだ。

えっと、ところどころ意味不明な箇所がありますが、オイラのヘッポコ語学力ではよく分かりません。(^_^;)
根本的な思い違いをしているところがあれば、ぜひご教授ください。m(_’_)m

  1. 服部文男訳『共産党宣言』新日本古典選書シリーズ、54、56ページ。ただし、訳文は、英文記事にしたがって一部手直しした。 []
  2. 同前、55ページ []
  3. 同前、58ページ []
  4. 同前、52ページ []
  5. 同前、82ページ []
  6. 同前、68ページ []
  7. 同前、85ページ []

Similar Articles:

Leave a Comment

NOTE - You can use these HTML tags and attributes:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> <img localsrc="" alt="">